Green Party: The Race Is On

The Race Is On

The Green Party presidential race is on, according to the Green Party of the United States

The candidates listed at the Green Party’s national website are:
Roland G. Aranjo
Sedinam Moyowasiza-Curry
Howie Hawkins
Dario Hunter
Dennis Lambert
David Rolde
Ian Schlakman

At the Green Party national website the party policy towards the various campaigns is

The national Green Party is committed to maintaining a neutral stance towards those seeking our nomination.

Ballotpedia reports there are 15 candidates seeking the Green Party presidential nod. One noteworthy “candidate” listed at Ballotpedia is “Kanye Deez Nutz West”, so information there may be questionable.

The <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_Green_Party_presidential_primaries#CandidatesWikipedia article</a about the Green Party presidential candidates lists the same seven candidates as the official list at the Green Party website, but includes two withdrawn candidates and two who have declined to be nominated.

Michigan Green Party to host 2020 Presidential Nominating convention

The Green Party National Committee has chosen Wayne State University Wayne State University logo to host the Presidential Nominating Convention from July 9th to July 12th, 2020. The winning bid came from the Michigan Green Party Other bids came from the South Carolina Green Party

Using ranked choice voting, the polling closed at midnight pacific time Sunday. The vote results can be found at the voting results page for the GNC.

Five bids were submitted. They covered three locations in two states and four dates. The bid from Detroit was the date chosen and was the same as one of the dates in one of the bids from South Carolina.

The selection process is led by the Annual National Meeting Committee.

Accredited state parties were able to vote.
Accredited caucuses were also able to vote.

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Goldman Sachs vs Adjunct Professor

SC Green candidate David Kulma attends a meet-n-greet. Three Democratic candidates address Rock Hill Rising.

Green Party candidate David Kulma attended a forum where retired Goldman Sachs executive Archie Parnell and two other Democrats addressed Rock Hill Rising.David Kulma, Green for Congress in SC's 5th

March 15th in Rock Hill South Carolina a group of citizens took their virtual community to the “real world” by hosting a gathering of three contenders for the Democratic Party nomination in SC Congressional District 5. The seat will be decided in a special election to be held June 20th. The opening was created when Mick Mulvaney resigned the seat to take a place in the Trump administration.

The event was sponsored by Rock Hill Rising at a local outlet of a small regional coffee house chain, Amelie’s Bakery. The three Democrats had been invited to address the group, one of dozens of Internet based activist groups across the state which sprung up in response to the Trump victory last November.

Three Democratic candidates, Les Murphy, Alexis Frank and Archie Parnell were invited to offer the group their views. David Kulma, The South Carolina Green Party nominee, attended after securing a ticket to the event. Kulma, a Winthrop University Adjunct Professor of Music for the past five years, will address Rock Hill Rising at their next regularly scheduled meeting at their invitation. Kulma listened, took notes, and spoke with organizers of the event.

Parnell, the best financed of the three, served twenty years as an executive at Goldman Sachs as well as a ten year stint as a tax attorney for Exxon Mobil.

“When I listened to Alexis Frank I thought she was fired up and ready to go.” Kulma said. “She wasn’t getting into many specifics but she was passionate and a good speaker.”

Les Murphy, a former Marine who discussed the difficulties of returning to civilian life after service also spoke.

But Parnell was the person of the moment in that room tonight.

“He seemed to project confidence. He had more applause and laugh lines. It was clear that he had spent a good deal of time being coached. He presented himself well.” said Kulma.

Liz Smith-Anderson of Rock Hill had submitted a question which was rejected by the sponsors. “I just wanted to know if the candidates think this is a Christian nation, why or why not. A big part of the Trump agenda is driven by fanatical people who don’t understand our nation’s history.” she said.

The Kulma campaign was launched only a week and a half ago, but the campaign is said to be building steam already. In most Democratic and Republican congressional races $2500 checks are common. But this “people powered” campaign has just broken past it’s first $1000 fundraising barrier.

“We don’t take PAC money, we don’t take corporate money, so we must ask for worker’s money, as painful as that is.” Kulma concluded.

A total of 15 candidates from of South Carolina’s ballot qualified parties have filed. Seven Republicans, three Democrats, an equal number of Libertarians, and a single candidate each have filed for the Green and American Party nominations. One of the Libertarians has also filed to seek the Constitution Party nod.

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Dutch Green Party now leads the left opposition to austerity

Jesse Klaver

While the world press was watching the rise of Party for Freedom nominee Geert Wilders the Dutch Green Party, GroenLinks was quietly and effectively growing it’s voter base. In the end, an almost four fold increase in voter support has pushed the party and it’s young leader Jesse Klaver

The Dutch Green Party under his leadership has been outspoken in support of the European Union, immigrant rights, and the environmental issues so often identified with the Greens world wide.

Klaver made it clear even before the election results were known that the Green Party grows when it stands by it’s principles especially when standing against forces of reaction.

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U.S. Green Party congratulates Austria’s Van der Bellen

vanderbellenLeaders of the Green Party of the United States have congratulated Alexander Van der Bellen, the former leader of the Green Party in Austria, on his election as president. Van der Bellen ran as an independent candidate with Green Party support and financial backing.

GPUS Co-Chair Bahram Zandi, who also co-chairs the party’s International Committee, said, “Alexander Van der Bellen’s victory is inspiring for Greens everywhere and for all those who care about the environment, democracy, and justice. We’re especially pleased to see that he defeated a right-wing anti-immigrant extremist in a close race.”

U.S. Greens encouraged Mr. Van der Bellen to continue opposing dangerous trade pacts like the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and to fight for the rights of working people and against austerity and NATO belligerence.

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Washington Times picks up Green Party release on Colbert

timesThe Washington Times picked up the recent Green Party news release responding to Stephen Colbert’s monologue on Sen. Bernie Sanders and the Greens, with reporter Valerie Richardson writing, “Irked Green Party officials cried foul Wednesday after CBS ‘Late Night’ host Stephen Colbert warned that voting for the Green presidential nominee would weaken presumptive Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton.”

The Times wrote, “In a Wednesday statement, the Green Party slammed the ‘Nader spoiler’ allegation, referring to it as a ‘baseless Democratic Party propaganda myth,'” blaming Al Gore’s 2000 “defeat on a series of factors. … The party has urged supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Bernard Sanders to cross over to the Green candidate in November. Polls show as many as 25 percent of the Vermont senator’s backers say they would not vote for Ms. Clinton, the former secretary of state.”

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The Hill: Green Party “has a chance to make an impact in the presidential election”

steinpeaceWith Hillary Clinton closing in on the Democratic presidential nomination, there is increasing coverage of Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein emerging as a November alternative.

The Hill says the Green Party “suddenly has a chance to make an impact in the presidential election, with polls showing that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are set to be the most unpopular nominees in modern times.” Stein “told The Hill that the likelihood of Trump and Clinton being the major-party nominees ‘creates a very propitious situation for the American people to actually have some choices.’ She insisted that the majority of people backing Clinton, the Democratic presidential front-runner, are doing so in order to keep Trump, the presumptive GOP nominee, out, rather than out of any real love for the former secretary of State and her policies.”

The Los Angeles Times says that while “the Green Party harbors few illusions about winning the White House,” if “even a small portion of [Bernie] Sanders voters cast ballots for Stein, it could prove transformative for the organization.” Stein said, “This is going to be a huge game-changer for the Green Party. We have seen many former Greens coming back, and new Greens coming in that have been dismayed by the treatment of the Sanders campaign at the hands of the Democratic Party.”

Salon writes that Stein said in a recent interview, “People are told over and over: don’t vote your values, vote your fears. But what we got was everything was everything we were afraid of.”

A letter to the editor of The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette promotes Stein as an option, while Mic writes that a voter who plans to back Stein in November debated ex-President Bill Clinton for half an hour this week.

A new PPP poll has Stein at two percent in North Carolina. Stein will campaign in Virginia this Friday, according to The Richmond Times-Dispatch.

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Stein continues appeal to Sanders supporters

steinpinTruthout interviews Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein about her appeal to supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders and other voters disenchanted with expected major-party nominees Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Stein said, “I think the Green Party and my campaign [are] ‘Plan B’ for Bernie supporters because the Democratic Party is the opposite of everything they’ve been working for and building for the last eight months or so, and to simply be dumped into Hillary’s campaign right now is kind of unthinkable. The sabotage of Bernie’s campaign by the Democratic Party really makes the point about why we need an independent party, because it has shown that it is very hard to have a revolutionary campaign inside of a counterrevolutionary party.”

She said of Sanders, “Bernie has been quite clear that he considers third parties a big liability, but I think that’s kind of old-school thinking here that looks to the Democrats of the New Deal, which we don’t have anymore. I’m hoping Bernie is still a living, thinking person who can actually learn with experience and maybe his thinking will change here, but it’s clear where his revolution will go inside the Democratic Party, and that is to a graveyard. The party does not tolerate reform, and there have been many efforts to do so.”

Stein said in an interview posted at Red Alert Politics, “All the reasons you were told you had to vote for the lesser of two evils, because you didn’t want the massive expanding wars, you didn’t want meltdown of the climate, you didn’t want the massive Wall Street bailout, you didn’t want the offshoring of our jobs — these were all things delivered to us signed, sealed, and delivered by a Democratic White House with two Democratic houses of Congress.”

The Wall Street Journal writes that “Americans are growing curious about their third-party options, search data and recent polls show, as both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump look likely to reach the general election as the most unpopular presidential nominees in modern history. … Stein is considered the front-runner for the Green Party nomination.” Seattle City Council member Kshama Sawant writes at Jacobin, “Jill Stein’s Green Party campaign will likely offer the strongest left challenge in November and deserves the broadest possible support.”

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“Terrible fit” for Green Party removed from Ohio U.S. House ballot

conditJim Condit, Jr., the Green Party nominee in the June 7 special election in Ohio’s Eighth U.S. House district and also for the seat in the November general election, will not be on the November ballot after the Butler County Board of Elections determined that he voted in the Republican presidential primary in March. Ohio law states that a candidate voting in a primary as a member of a political party different from the party that nominated the candidate forfeits the nomination. However, Condit remains on the ballot as a Green in the special election in two weeks.

According to WHIO-TV in Dayton, Condit “admitted that he is ‘a terrible fit’ for the Green Party.” He added, “It’s such a bad fit that in a way I’m relieved.” Greens in the district say they will select another nominee.