Post-election Green Party 2010 ballot access roundup

November 3, 2010 in Ballot Access

Last night the Green Party won ballot access in New York and Texas, retained it in Massachusetts and Ohio, lost it in Illinois and Wisconsin, and fell short of gaining it in Arkansas, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada. Here are the results by state:

Arkansas: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Jim Lendall got less than 3% of the vote for governor.

Illinois: Greens lost the ballot line and major party status gained in 2006 by Rich Whitney’s 10% for governor when Whitney got less than 5% of the vote for governor this year.

Maryland: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Maria Allwine got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

Massachusetts: Greens retain ballot access and party status after Nat Fortune earned 5% for State Auditor.

Minnesota: Annie Young’s 2.7% for State Auditor falls short of winning major party status, but retains minor party status for the Minnesota Greens.

Nevada: Greens fail to gain ballot access after David Curtis got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

New York: Greens gain ballot status through 2014 thanks to Howie Hawkins earning over 50,000 votes for governor.

Ohio: Greens retain ballot status thanks to Dennis Spisak earning over 1% for governor.

Texas: Greens gain ballot status through 2012 thanks to Ed Lindsay earning over 5% for comptroller.

Wisconsin: Greens lose ballot status after not running any statewide candidates who could qualify.

8 responses to Post-election Green Party 2010 ballot access roundup

  1. Results from Maine:

    MGIP Came VERY close in several elections across the state – but no cigar.

    The tightest race came in Brunswick – a Democrat stronghold – where Fred Horch won 34% of the vote, losing to the Dem contender who garned 38%.

    Anna Trevorrow running for Maine legislature in Portland lost but certainly scared the winning Dem with her 31%.

    Former Gubernatorial candidate, Lynn Williams claimed 12% of the vote coming in third behind the Democrat. This was a tough race as National GOP zeroed in on 5 strategic Senatorial races, dumping tons of adverts. The Republican in William’s district won with 51%,

    Another notable Green was Seth Berner, who received 28% of the vote in his legislative district.

    MGIP ran a total of 15 candidates for State Legislature and Senate.

    We do have one “stealth” victory. Technical difficulties arose in House District 119 (Portland) where Ben Chipman – normally registered as a Green – was forced to run as an Independent. He won his race 54% to 45%. Portland City Council also retained a Green councilor in John Anton’s re-election.

  2. Actually, our status is NOT sure in Ohio!

    The law of 5% percent was declared unconstitutional four years ago and the general assembly has IGNORED the issue. We were granted temporary status by the SOS. We don’t know if that will last.

  3. Good luck, Ohio.

  4. Overall I would say it was a pretty bad night for the Green Party in Illinois

  5. The Maryland Green Party has NOT lost its ballot line YET. We are still in the process of petitioning. We need to collect 10,000 valid signatures. We usually have a 70-80% validation rate and we are currently at 8,500 sigs. We need to collect at least 12,000 to have a decent chance.

    HELP THE MARYLAND GREEN PARTY MAINTAIN ITS BALLOT LINE.

    We need volunteers from VA, DC, DE, and PA. Please come and help us out. You can email robb.tufts@yahoo.com to find out how you can volunteer and help us gather the remaining signatures we need.

    We are doing a 10X10X10 campaign. We are looking for groups of 10 volunteers to gather 10 signatures a day for 10 days. That’s 1000 signatures. If we can get 4 groups of 10 to do this, we will make our goal before our December 1st deadline. Please please please help us out!

  6. Hello can anyone answer my questions. How many states does the green party have ballot recognition after last night? Will the greens be making a response to micheal moores saying on democracy now that their might be a candidate opposing obama from the left in 2012. Why didnt the greens stand in california district 8 when cindy sheehan got 14 as a green backed indepent 2years ago and the actual greens got 8per cent in 2006. In britain the greens picked one seat in parliament and concentrated on that including all offices below and this led to an mp. What district or districts would the greens in usa do this with i would have thought california district 8 would be on short list. It needs to be somewhere where we dont have to worry about ballot access?

  7. James, I can try to answer some of your questions.

    How many states does the green party have ballot recognition after last night?

    I think this has not yet been determined for certain yet. Ballot Access News is one of the best sources for tracking third party ballot access, but as soon as this has been determined we will post that information here.

    Will the greens be making a response to micheal moores saying on democracy now that their might be a candidate opposing obama from the left in 2012.

    Good question, I will forward this to the Green Party’s media coordinator.

    Why didnt the greens stand in california district 8 when cindy sheehan got 14 as a green backed indepent 2years ago and the actual greens got 8per cent in 2006.

    Very good question. Green Party candidates step forward at the local and state party level. Maybe the San Francisco Greens failed to find a good candidate, I don’t know. That would have been a very good race to run in.

    In britain the greens picked one seat in parliament and concentrated on that including all offices below and this led to an mp. What district or districts would the greens in usa do this with i would have thought california district 8 would be on short list. It needs to be somewhere where we dont have to worry about ballot access?

    This “beach head” strategy was discussed at some levels of the Green Party, the idea of putting everything into one race. It has been attempted to some degree, for example there was a national effort to elect Malik Rahim to Congress from New Orleans, and it failed. One needs the perfect district, the perfect candidate, and the perfect circumstances. We had some very close races that fit this bill. Ben Manski was the perfect candidate, running for state legislature in Madison, a perfect district, with an open seat and a conservative Democrat opponent, perfect conditions. He lost 49%-32%. In Maine there were at least three Green Party candidates for State legislature running in very green friendly districts that finished within 10 percentage points of the Democrat. One, Fred Horch, lost by just 2% of the vote, less than 200 votes.

    Because the Green Party is decentralized, each state party is going to run or not run candidates. Within a specific state the greens could put all their resources into one race, or run more broadly. Green voters can get upset if they don’t have a green to vote for on election day, which is a reason to run statewide, but the success rate definitely increases the lower down the ballot you go.

  8. Thanks For This Post, was added to my bookmarks.