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Arizona Green Party regains ballot status

angeltorresFrom the Arizona Republic:

After a two-year absence, the Arizona Green Party has regained ballot status.

That means Green candidates will have an easier path to get on the ballot in 2016 and 2018.

The party, which says it has 5,600 members statewide, lost ballot status after the 2012 election, when its nominee for U.S. president failed to receive at least 5 percent of the votes cast in Arizona for that office. As a result, in 2014 any Green Party members seeking office were effectively treated as an independent candidate, which triggers a much-higher threshold for voter signatures to qualify for the ballot.

But thanks to a little help from their friends — many from other political parties — the Greens are again a recognized party. They gathered the signatures of more than 25,000 registered voters to meet state standards for being an established party. They join the Republicans, Democrats, Libertarians and the Americans Elect parties as having ballot status in Arizona.

Party co-chair Angel Torres credited volunteers for gathering signatures, an effort that began in January 2013. He said the Greens got a lot of support from other political parties in Arizona.

“A main reason people sign our petition is they think voters should have more choices,” he said. And they’ll have that choice in 2016. The party is already recruiting candidates, including Torres’ likely bid for the state Legislature.

Dave Schwab

2 Comments

  1. The Green Party is fighting two ballot access lawsuits in Arizona. One, along with the Libertarians, challenges the voter registration form that lists only the two largest parties with their own checkbox, and requires voters who want to register into any other party (qualified or not) to write in the name of the party in the “other” box, on a line that is less than an inch long.

    The other lawsuit challenges the February petition deadline, on the grounds that it is far too early. Arizona primaries are in August and it seems ridiculous to force new parties to qualify six months before the primary. If the deadline weren’t so early the party would have been in in 2014.

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