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Harris, Wallace win contested Green primaries in Maryland

harrisJoshua Harris has won the contested Green Party primary for Baltimore mayor, and Nancy Wallace has won the contested primary for the Green nomination in Maryland’s Eighth U.S. House District.

Though the Maryland Green Party is ballot-qualified, the state of Maryland only sponsors Democratic and Republican primaries, so the state, county, and city Greens held by-mail balloting throughout April and in-person voting on April 30. Harris defeated David Marriott and Emanuel McCray; vote totals have yet to be released. In the Eighth District, Wallace received 45 votes, Elizabeth Croydon six, and Charles “Teddy” Galloway III four.

While the U.S. Senate and other U.S. House primaries were not contested, voters had the option of selecting “None of the Above” or saying no candidate should be run. Margaret Flowers won the U.S. Senate nomination. Other U.S. House candidates are Nnabu Eze (Third District), Kamesha Clark (Fourth District), George Gluck (Sixth District), and Myles Hoenig (Seventh District).

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Talk of Stein as possible alternative to Sanders gets louder

SteinSandersWith Hillary Clinton’s emergence as the likely Democratic presidential nominee, online chatter about Green Party candidate Jill Stein as a November alternative for supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders is getting louder.

Myles Hoenig, Green Party candidate for U.S. House in Maryland’s Seventh District, told PressTV that Stein “is a true revolutionary politician in the United States, not Sanders or [Republican Donald] Trump.” Hoenig said, “Where will Sanders’ supporters go if they won’t go to Clinton? These voters are progressive and untrusting of our political establishment. The Green Party addresses all their needs and goes much further than even Sanders on positions.”

Bill Boyarsky writes at Truthdig that Sanders’ supporters “would be welcomed by Dr. Jill Stein. The physician-activist is favored to win the Green Party presidential nomination this year after heading the party’s ticket in 2012.” Stein told Boyarsky, “The whole reason for having an independent third party that cannot be silenced is there are 25 percent of Bernie’s voters who are not going into that dark night to vote for the No. 1 cheerleader for Wal-Mart, for Wall Street, for an endless war. They are looking for another place to hang their hat.”

Inquisitr reports on Stein’s outreach to Sanders, writing that Sanders has “refused the Green Party’s courting in the past, and he says he won’t play the part of the spoiler. Still, supporters of the idea point out that the Green Party National Convention takes place in August, following the Democratic National Convention in July. On social media, many have said that superdelegates should consider that hundreds of thousands of Sanders’ supporters might demand that he accept Stein’s offer” to join a Green ticket.

Sputnik News reports that according to journalist Sam Sacks, “If Sanders lost the Democratic nomination, millions of his voters could opt out from supporting Clinton, possibly seeking another candidate.” Dave Lindorff of Op-Ed News also writes about a possible Sanders spot on the Green ticket.

Sanders has said he will support the Democratic nominee.

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Colorado newspaper profiles Green Senate nominee Menconi

menconiThe Colorado Independent profiles Colorado Green Party U.S. Senate nominee Arn Menconi, “a social justice activist from Carbondale who served two terms on the Eagle County Commission” who, the Independent says, is targeting incumbent Democrat Michael Bennet “from the left.”

Menconi is “the founder of SOS Outreach — think Outward Bound, but with skiing and snowboarding — and the author of an audiobook titled ‘Lied to Death,’ in which in he interviewed Pentagon Papers whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg. He’s been politically active in Colorado for years” and became a Green this year. He “says he wants to represent ‘the 99 percent.’ He believes Bennet is out of touch with Coloradans.”

Menconi said, “We’re run by a global corporate mafia. Everyone who I’m talking to believes that we’re run by an oligarchy.”

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Colorado Green U.S. Senate candidate Menconi introduces himself to voters

menconiColorado Green Party U.S. Senate nominee Arn Menconi published a letter in several Colorado newspapers introducing himself to voters and outlining his campaign agenda.

Menconi wrote in part, “I will fight to end the military industrial dominance of our government with its greed and killings, end our dependence on fossil fuels by 2050, providing single payer health care for all as a right not as a privilege, and break up the Big Banks and power of Wall Street that has been stealing resources from our children and grandchildren. … Our world is not for sale. Our country will not be the biggest terrorist. Our judicial system will not lock up the whistleblower and communities of color while politicians commit war crimes and CEO’s fraud. They will no longer walk free while we become slaves.”

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Maryland Green U.S. Senate candidate Flowers writes about removal from debate

flowersMaryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers writes in Baltimore Brew about being forcibly removed from a candidate forum at Goucher College on March 28. Flowers had been twice invited to the event before being disinvited.

She writes, “Greens constantly face these kinds of barriers that prevent them from competing with the two major parties. … The media barely reports our existence and we are excluded from debates and public forums. … This is part of the democracy crisis — when a party that does not represent the interests of the wealthy is left out, the public debate is stifled. And voters are the biggest losers when alternative voices are left out.”

Flowers writes that had she “been permitted to participate in the debate,” she would have raised several issues “that are not being discussed” including construction of the Cove Point fracked gas terminal, the impact of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, “ending poverty by bringing back a Guaranteed Basic Income,” ending the Drug War and mass incarceration, and holding Wall Street accountable for the financial crisis of the last decade and its continued effects.

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Colorado Greens nominate Menconi for Senate, Willmeng and Worthey for Congress

coloradoThe Green Party of Colorado nominated former Eagle County Commissioner Arn Menconi for U.S. Senate, and Colorado Community Rights Network board member Cliff Willmeng and Robert Lee Worthey for U.S. House, at its state nominating convention on Sunday.

Menconi said that as a senator, “I will fight to end the military industrial dominance of our government with its endless greed and killings, end our dependence on fossil fuels by 2050, fight for single payer healthcare for all as a right not as a privilege, and break up the Big Banks and power of Wall Street that has been stealing resources from our children and grandchildren.”

Willmeng, who is seeking the Second District seat currently held by Democratic Rep. Jared Polis, said, “Colorado’s communities, workers, families, our environment, and our basic human and civil rights can no longer accommodate the answers being handed to us by powerful and disconnected representatives. Too much is at stake, and entire generations depend on a clear alternative to the tragic policies of war, environmental destruction, racism, poverty, and elevating levels of human disenfranchisement.”

Worthey will be seeking the Sixth District U.S. House seat currently held by Rep. Mike Coffman. The Colorado Greens also nominated ex-Thornton councilwoman Jenice “J.J.” Dove for the state legislature in House District 34.

The Colorado Green also pledged all five of their presidential nominating delegates to Jill Stein.

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Maryland Green congressional candidate Croydon takes part in White House cannabis march

Elizabeth Croydon, who is running for the Green Party U.S. House nomination in Maryland’s Eighth District, took part in the #Reschedule420 Emergency National Mobilization to Deschedule Cannabis demonstration outside the White House last Saturday.

Charles “Teddy” Galloway III and Nancy Wallace are also seeking the Green nomination in the by-mail primary.

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Maryland Green U.S. House candidate Hoenig says Greens are real alternative

hoenigMyles Hoenig, Green Party candidate for U.S. House in Maryland’s Seventh District, said in an interview with Iran’s PressTV that the Green Party, not Sen. Bernie Sanders, offers the real alternative to traditional American politics.

“For the Democratic Party, Bernie Sanders is the real deal when it comes to a ‘revolution,'” Hoenig said. “However, Sanders is not revolutionary. He’s running as a Democrat. He wants taxes to be fairer. He wants our military to be used better, and if better, have proxies carry out our wars of aggression, primarily in the Middle East.”

He continued, “The only party at the moment that truly reflects a greater degree of revolution is the Green Party, whose likely candidate is Jill Stein. Her ‘Power to the People Plan’ creates deep system change, moving from the greed and exploitation of corporate capitalism to a human-centered economy that puts people, planet and peace over profit. Her platform goes far beyond that of Sanders or any other Democrat: not just free college education but debt forgiveness, something that would leave the banks empty handed and not something Sanders advocates.”

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Flowers forcibly removed from Maryland U.S. Senate candidate forum

Maryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers was forcibly prevented from participating in a candidate forum sponsored by the Baltimore Jewish Council and Goucher College on Monday evening. Flowers, who had been extended invitations to the debate twice by the organizers, was abruptly disinvited without notice two weeks before the event.

When the candidates were asked to take the stage, Flowers stepped up to remind the BJC that her exclusion was in violation of IRS regulations that require non-profit organizations to be non-partisan. She said, “Many times during the first half of the forum, the moderator and Republican candidates emphasized that in this political moment voters are fed up with the status quo and are looking for alternatives. Yet, the one candidate who was invited and provides an alternative to the the two party system was excluded. I was ready to answer the questions but I was not given the chance. I wanted to participate in this debate, not protest it.”

Flowers was invited to the event on January 7 and accepted that same day. At that time, Sarah Mersky, the Baltimore Jewish Council’s Director of Government Relations, said the event would be “a wonderful opportunity for Baltimore and the Jewish community to get to know you better.” The BJC also later Dr. Flowers know of a postponement of the original February date, indicating that they still wanted her to take part. However, on March 11, Flowers received a terse message from Mersky disinviting her, saying the event would be limited “to contested primary candidates only” — a late change in the rules. The Flowers campaign said in reply that the IRS “has issued regulations for non-profit organizations requiring them to be non-partisan and inclusive” and that “in recent debates in the Baltimore area, non-profit organizations that initially excluded Green Party candidates decided to reverse their decision when their lawyers looked at the law.”

In phone conversations and personal meetings with the Flowers campaign, the BJC stated that the event was limited to candidates polling at least five in polls, a new requirement that had never been mentioned before to the Flowers campaign. Flowers pointed out that there have been no polls of Green Party candidates, making it impossible for the BJC to know that Flowers does not reach the polling threshold. Flowers asserted that her level of support in the Green Party is well above five percent.

Under Maryland law, Green Party candidates are not permitted to appear on the ballot printed by the state and distributed to voters during the state-funded primary election. “This is one of many ways the two wealth-based parties create an unfair electoral system for those who challenge them,” said Flowers. The Green Party is holding a self-funded primary election that any person registered to vote and affiliated with the Green Party may participate in. By rule, all Green Party nominations are contested.