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Green Party to Tea Party: What about military spending?

The Colorado Independent has an interesting story about Colorado Green Party US Senate candidate Bob Kinsey:

In the nailbiter Colorado U.S. Senate race watched by the nation this week, Green Party candidate Bob Kinsey came in third place, after Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet and Republican Ken Buck. Kinsey pulled down 2.1 percent of the vote, i.e., yays from roughly 36,300 voters. That’s a lot of people… In the year of the Tea Party, however, Kinsey’s main platform position would have revolutionized federal spending and should have drawn the attention at least of self-proclaimed fiscal hawks on the right.

“My major focus is foreign policy,” Kinsey said. “I want to cut the military budget by 75% and use that money to create jobs. If you include in military spending the drug war, Homeland Security, the CIA, and other agencies, that’s over a trillion dollars a year. The AFSC calculated that you could provide every unemployed person with a $50,000 job [out of the current defense budget] and [just spending what was left over] the U.S. would still spend more on the military than any other country in the world.”

Soon-to-be GOP House Speaker John Boehner is talking a lot about reining in government even though he has yet to mention a program he plans to cut. You can bet his small government plan will come nothing close to the budget-slashing that could stem from a Kinsey plan.

Read the full story “Green Party to Tea Party: What about military spending?” at the Colorado Independent.

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Green Senate Races 2010

The Green Party is running 14 13 candidates for U.S. Senate across the nation, from Arkansas to West Virginia. Midge Potts in Missouri has dropped out after failing to get the 10,000 signatures necessary to get on the ballot. Mel Packer in Pennsylvania collected over 20,000 signatures necessary to get on the ballot, which were challenged, forcing him off the ballot. This number matchesis one shy of the 2006 election when 14 candidates for US Senate were on the ballot. There are 37 US Senate elections this November (3 are special elections).

The Green Senatorial Campaign Committee, a political action committee of the Green Party of the United States, has a new website that is worth checking out. The GSCC raises money for Green Party candidates for Congress.

2010 Candidates for US Senate on the Green Party ticket

Colia Clark – New York Ms. Clark is a veteran of the civil rights movement. Her work has included activism in the fields of women’s rights and workers’ rights, as well as activism and advocacy for homeless people and youth. Most recently, she has worked with the Cynthia McKinney for President campaign with “Power to the People”. Clark is a chair of Grandmothers for the Release of Mumia Abu Jamal. During the Civil Rights era, Colia Clark was a Special Assistant to Medgar W. Evers, field Secretary for the NAACP. Clark later joined the Mississippi Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) doing voter registration work.

Cecile Lawrence – New York Ms. Lawrence is originally from Jamaica, and has been living in upstate New York for over 18 years. She has worked in college administration, non-profit administration and in college teaching. Dr. Lawrence has been active in the fight for universal health care and opposing the method of drilling for natural gas called High Volume Horizontal Hydrofracturing that threatens the health and welfare as well as the water of all of the residents of New York State. She has a PhD in Philosophy, Interpretation & Culture from Binghamton University (S.U.N.Y.) and is a graduate of the University at Buffalo (S.U.N.Y.) Law School. A resident of Tioga County, shes been a board member of local civic organizations such as the YWCA and the Southern Tier Independence Center, and is currently a member of Tioga Peace and Justice.

Natasha Pettigrew – Maryland Natasha Pettigrew was tragically killed on in September when an SUV hit her while she rode her bike in the early morning hours. The Maryland Green Party may replace her name on the ballot but otherwise she will appear on the November ballot. Pettigrew was 30 years old at the time of her death. She had taken a leave from Law School to run for US Senate, was a former Americorps volunteer, and a deeply compassionate person.

Tom Clements – South Carolina Tom Clements got a huge boost in his campaign for US Senate in South Carolina when a virtual unknown with a questionable legal history won the Democratic primary. Liberals in South Carolina are taking a second look now at Tom Clements, who is coming across as a very appealing choice. Clements worked for 13 years for Greenpeace International, and was the Executive Director of the Nuclear Control Institute in Washington DC.

Jesse Johnson – West Virginia Jesse Johnson is an outspoken activist against mountain top removal and opponent of the mining interests that run West Virginia. He was the West Virginia Mountain Party’s candidate for Governor in 2004 and US Senate in 2006, before the Mountain Party became a state affiliate of the Green Party. Johnson sought the Presidential nomination of the Green Party in 2008.

LeAlan Jones – Illinois LeAlan Jones has been speaking truth to power for 17 years about poverty, inequality and justice. In 1993 LeAlan made headlines with his NPR documentary “Ghetto Life 101“ which he made with 14 year-old Lloyd Newman and producer David Isay. He continued writing and producing work about poverty and inner city violence, was the youngest recipient of the prestigious Peabody award. LeAlan Jones has been polling between 4% and 9% and has demonstrated that he is a serious and viable candidate for Barack Obama’s Senate Seat.

John Gray – Arkansas Gray is a retired engineer and the Mayor of Greenland, Arkansas. He is a strong environmentalist and corporate critic. Last cycle Arkansas did very well in congressional races, largely due to the Republicans and Democrats opting not to run against each other. In the US Senate race in 2008 Rebekah Kennedy got over 200,000 votes for 20.56% of the vote in a head to head match up with Democrat Mark Prior. This year is far more competitive with Democrat Blanche Lincoln being challenged by Republican John Boozman and Independent Trevor Drown.

Bob Kinsey – Colorado Kinsey ran for US Senate in Colorado two years ago, getting 46,000 votes for 2.13% in a four way race. He is a Marine Corps veteran, a retired history teacher, and retired United Church of Christ clergyman with forty years of advocacy for the Just Peace theology.

Jerry Joslyn – Arizona Jerry Joslyn’s history is as a small businessman in computers and publishing. He served with both the California Air National Guard and Arizona National Guard. This is an interesting race with John McCain being challenged by a Democrat and by a strong Libertarian candidate David Nolan, former Chair of the Libertarian Party and inventor of the “Nolan Chart”. Josslyn is a great candidate as well, Iracm currently watching his live streamed debate here.

Duane Roberts – California As a community activist, Roberts has been a defender of immigrant rights, a critic of police misconduct and abuse, and has even exposed political corruption. In 2003, he helped organize what then was one of the biggest anti-war demonstrations in Orange County since the Vietnam War at the Richard Nixon Library in Yorba Linda. Roberts has been involved in many demonstrations and marches and has used his extensive knowledge of police behavior to protect the civil rights and liberties of protesters.

Candy Neville – Oregon I have not been able to verify that she is running but according to this she was nominated by the Pacific Green Party. If anyone has more information on this race please let me know. (Candy Neville is NOT a Green Party candidate for US Senate ~RKH)

Jim Brewer – Hawaii I don’t have much information about this race. If you have any, please let me know.

Jeff Russell (Write in) – Connecticut Russell is a new candidate, running as a write-in option in Connecticut. Last year Ralph Ferrucci ran for US Senate in Connecticut and won 6,387 votes for less than 1 percent.

Richard Weir (Write in) – North Carolina I’ll confess I am out of time, so I am referring you to this interview on Z Blogs with Mr. Weir. I would vote for him if I could.

Election History for US Senate

The first candidates to run for US Senate on the Green Party ticket were Linda Martin of Hawaii and Mary Jordan in Alaska, both in 1992. Martin got over 13% of the vote in a four way race, Jordan got over 8%. The following cycle Barbara Blong ran for US Senate in California and took in 140,000 votes. Four candidates run for US Senate in 1996, three more in 1998, and then ten candidates joined Ralph Nader on the ballot in 2000 as the Green Party began to really grow across the nation. Nine ran in 2002, eight in 2004, 14 in 2006, and seven in 2008.

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Senate candidate Bob Kinsey on Western Colorado campaign swing

Peter Shelton at the Telluride Watch reports on Colorado Green Party US Senate candidate Bob Kinsey:

Green Party candidate for U.S. Senate Bob Kinsey pulled into Ridgway Wednesday and promptly popped the trunk on his VW Jetta to show off the tank of recycled vegetable oil in the back. “The needle hardly dropped at all on the drive over from Denver yesterday,” he said of the hybrid diesel/veggie vehicle. A tall and youthful 73, former history teacher Kinsey talks the talk and drives the drive of his Green Party platform. That message has primarily to do with what Kinsey calls the “corporate duopoly” and the stranglehold it has on American politics. And, inevitably, its dire consequences for the planet.

“Our fossil-fuel economy is doing violence to the planet,” he said. And both Republicans and Democrats are perpetuating the old model. “You’ve got to give the American people a vote for some other narrative,” he told The Watch. “We’re told to keep it a two-party game. That you need money in order to compete, to buy ads in the media. The media love that. If a person has to have corporate money in order to run, you don’t have a democracy. Democracy should be about telling the truth.”

Read more: The Watch Newspapers – Senate Green Party Candidate in Uphill Fight

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News from Ed Bortz, Pittsburgh Green for US House

Pennsylvania Green Party candidate for US House in PA’s 14th District Ed Bortz has been very active recently. On September 13th, Bortz spoke out against hydrofracking at a Pittsburgh City Council meeting, which earned him a mention in at least one news outlet.

Bortz has received the endorsement of the Gertrude Stein Political Club of Greater Pittsburgh for his strong advocacy of the rights of people in the GLBT community.

He is also one of several Green candidates who have signed onto the Fight Washington Corruption pledge, including Ben Emery (CA-4), John Gray (AR-Sen), LeAlan Jones (IL-Sen), Bob Kinsey (CO-Sen), Simon Ribeiro (IL-9), Steven Welzer (NJ-4), and Julia Williams (MI-12). Candidates who sign the pledge support overturning the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision allowing unlimited corporate spending on elections, passing the Fair Elections Now Act to establish option public campaign financing for congressional races, and enacting measures to limit the influence of corporate lobbyists.

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Durango paper interviews Bob Kinsey, CO Green for US Senate

The Durango Herald has an interview with Colorado Green Party US Senate candidate Bob Kinsey:

A veteran, an ordained minister, a peace activist and a retired school teacher, Denver resident Bob Kinsey isn’t a typical politician.

He’s never been elected to office, but that didn’t stop him from making a third-party bid for the U.S. Senate with the Green Party.

Kinsey said he is sick of politicians who sacrifice their values in the name of party unity and winning elections, a problem he sees as endemic across both major political parties.

Kinsey would like to see that change. He wants more people to vote with their consciences, not their parties.

“One-third of the state is independent or they say they are. … Then why don’t you get with a party that you think represents your values?” he said Sunday.

Read the full article at the Durango Herald.

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Denver newspaper interviews Bob Kinsey, CO Green for US Senate

The Washington Park Profile has an interview with Colorado Green Party US Senate candidate Bob Kinsey entitled “Green Candidate Bob Kinsey Not Afraid to Speak His Mind”:

Kinsey is running for the U.S. Senate on the Green Party ticket. He came up short in a 2004 bid to unseat Marilyn Musgrave for the House of Representatives seat from District 4, and garnered a noteworthy 50,004 votes (2.1 percent of the votes cast) in the 2008 Senate race that sent Mark Udall to the Capitol.

Having taught high school history and social studies for 25 years, Kinsey says, “We need more voices in the political arena so we can address the issues rationally, instead of simply demonizing the other side.” He believes the two major parties are so hamstrung by obligation to their financial contributors that they are unable to function in the best interests of their constituents.

Read the full article at the Washington Park Profile.

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Rebekah Kennedy Pulls Record Results for U.S. Senate

Rebekah Kennedy, running for U.S. Senate in a head to head race against conservative Democrat Mark Pryor in Arkansas, took in 206,504 votes for 20.54% of the vote. This is the highest percent vote return of any Green Party candidate for U.S. Senate ever. Furthermore, 206,504 votes is the second most number of votes won by a Green Party U.S. Senate candidate ever, second only to Medea Benjamin’s 2000 Senate race in California (326,828). For a brief history of Green U.S. Senate candidates click here.

In Illinois, Kathy Cummings pulled in 115,621 votes for 2.56%, the fifth highest number of votes for a Green Senate candidate.

In Colorado, Bob Kinsey won 46,014 votes for 2.13%.

In Michigan, Harvey Mikkelson won 44,439 votes for 0.92%.

In Washington D.C., Keith Ware’s 14,602 votes netted him 7.45%, which puts him in the top 10 highest vote percents for Green Senate candidates.

Chris Lugo in Tennessee took 9,103 votes for 0.38&, and Steve Larrick in Nebraska took in 7,235 votes for 0.95%.

All told, these seven candidates won 443,518 votes, the most votes for a Green Party slate of candidates since the 2000 election, when Medea Benjamin and 9 other candidates brought in over 700,000 votes. This should be seen as a good sign for the Green Party.

My spreadsheet listing Green Party US Senate candidates is on Google docs, and it is mostly based on the excellent Green Party Election Database.

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Green Party Candidates for U.S. Senate 2008

As reported in the Fall 2008 Green Pages, the Green Party’s seven U.S. Senate candidates:
Kathy Cummings
Kathy Cummings – Illinois

Cummings is running against Richard Durbin because “in 2002 he knew Iraq had no weapons of mass destruction. He kept that information from the public. He allowed Bush to fool the American people into starting an unjustified war. You can see Durbin confess to this on YouTube. See his ‘Bombshell announcement’ on my website. He kept quiet for five years because he claims he was sworn to secrecy by the Senate Intelligence Committee! By doing so, he showed his loyalty was with a dishonest regime and not with the People.” Cummings is a Peace candidate who supports the oath of office to uphold the constitution, provide health care to all people and create an ecologically sustainable country.

Rebekah KennedyRebekah Kennedy – Arkansas

Kennedy is a lawyer who has proudly worked in the areas of civil rights and on behalf of victims of workplace discrimination. She previously ran for the office of Arkansas Attorney General and received 4.67% of the vote. She is motivated by the fact that not one Democrat or Republican was willing to run against an incumbent in federal races. Kennedy is challenging Mark Pryor, motivated to run due to Pryor’s many votes in opposition to the people of Arkansas. She currently serves as Elections Co-chair for the Green Party of Arkansas, a position she also held from 2002-2007. Fromm 2007-08 Kennedy served as Public Relations Co-chair. Her reasons for running include challenging Pryor’s votes to continue support for the occupation of Iraq and the Military Commissions Act. Kennedy calls for the U.S. to take the lead in stopping global warming and to create a national health care system.

Bob KinseyBob Kinsey – Colorado

Kinsey is a retired United Church of Christ minister, history teacher, and a veteran of the Marine Corps. His son-in-law is currently serving in Iraq. Kinsey sums up his campaign with the phrase “Respect Life!” This means government must set policies to insure life into the future. The current economic system, run by uncontrolled growth, “is the ideology of a cancer cell.” “We have to redirect our economics to avoid the tipping point” of environmental catastrophe. He supports building sustainable infrastructure, tax incentives for wind power, organic agriculture, safe ranching practices, and mass transit. Kinsey connects his support of the Ten Key Principles to his values as a minister. “The Green Party values are a good secular representation of what Jesus called ‘the Kingdom of God.'”

Steve LarrickSteve Larrick – Nebraska

Larrick is running against Ben Nelson, considered the most conservative Democrat in the Senate. On his website, Larrick discusseshis policies for ending the occupation of Iraq, providing health care to all Americans, solving America’s economic problems, reducing dependence on foreign oil and protecting civil liberties.

Chris LugoChris Lugo – Tennessee

Lugo is running against Republican Lamar Alexander. For the past five years he has worked as a peace activist with state wide coalitions to end the war in Iraq. This activism will be helpful in getting out the anti-war message, which is at the core of his campaign. Having worked for the past ten years with a range of progressive coalitions in Nashville and across the country has given Lugo a sense of what issues are important at the Federal level. Lugo entered the U.S. Senate race “to be a voice for the progressive issues that need to be discussed in Tennessee – ending the war, bringing health care to every citizen, abolishing our nuclear weapons stockpile, addressing issues of racial justice in the South, media democracy, election reform, international peace, and publicly funded campaigns.”

Harley Mikkelson Harley Mikkelson – Michigan

Mikkelson is a Vietnam veteran, a union member and an active Green Party member since 2002. He ran for Congress in 2002 opposed to starting a war in Iraq. In 2004 he ran calling for the immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. He has been in the Peace Movement since becoming active in Vietnam Veterans Against the War in 1968. His campaign focus is to bring U.S. troops home immediately. In addition, Mikkelson would campaign for Fair Trade, in order to bring back jobs to the United States, and would stress the need to provide more educational opportunities and health benefits for everyone.

Keith Ware
Keith Ware – District of Columbia

(no description in Green Pages – the following is from multiple sources) Keith Ware is a community, environmental and human rights activist in DC, and owner and operator of Nature Green, an Eco-store in downtown DC. “As a fourth-generation Washingtonian, as well as a father, business owner and community activist, I understand the District’s needs and will be the people’s voice.” “The fact that Washington residents have no federal representation violates their basic rights as U.S. citizens. This is an issue close to my heart as well as the hearts of all Washingtonians.”

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Green News Roundup

The Colorado Green Party is running Bob Kinsey for US Senate in a four way race. The Constitution Party is also putting a candidate up in the race along with the two corporate parties. To find out more about this race, visit this site.

In a decidedly more local race, John Anthony La Pietra, Green Party candidate for Calhoun County Clerk and Register of Deeds has announced that he will make webspace available for towns in the county which don’t have websites of their own. The same story makes mention of Green Party candidate Lynn Meadows. She’s running for Michigan’s 7th congressional district.

Over in Virginia, the Green Party has announced support for a county bond issue. Interestingly enough, both the Democrats and Republicans are opposed to the bond issue.

Finally, both Cynthia McKinney and Ralph Nader have signed a pledge to, in essence, raise holy hell in the event this fall’s election is stolen as the last two were. To get those details from Yahoo!, just click here

That’s all folks! For now at any rate.

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A short history of Green Party U.S. Senate races

In 1992, Linda Martin and Mary Jordan became the first Green Party candidates for U.S. Senate.

Mary Jordan ran for U.S. Senate in Alaska, receiving over 20,000 votes, 8.37% of the total vote in a three way race against the infamous Frank Murkowski. Linda MartinLinda Martin ran for U.S. Senate in Hawai’i against an entrenched Democratic Party in 1992 against Daniel Inouye, who had been in the Senate since 1962, and who handedly defeated his opponents winning over 70% of the vote in every re-election – that is until 1992. Linda Martin earned 49,921 votes, 13.73%, holding Inouye to 57.3%, while the Republican picked up 26.9%. Her race changed Hawai’i politics, and Green Party politics, setting records for both total votes and percent of votes by a Green in a partisan race. In this video, Mike Feinstein interviews Linda Martin in 2003 about her campaign.

Two years later, Barbara Blong picked up 140,567 votes running for U.S. Senate in California. In the 1990s, Greens ran for U.S. Senate in Alaska (twice), Hawai’i, California, Maine, Oregon (twice), New Mexico, and New York.

In 2000, with the Nader campaign getting big, Greens ran 10 candidates for U.S. Senate, who combined took in 706,538 votes, led by Vance Hansen (Arizona, 108,926, 7.80%), Medea Benjamin (California, 326,828, 3.08%, and Doug Sandage (Texas, 91,448, 1.46%).
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