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Sat. 2/23: Green Campaign School in Worcester, MA

campaign school logo

You can make a difference!

Saturday, February 23, 9:30am – 5:30pm

First Unitarian Church of Worcester

90 Main Street, Worcester, Massachusetts

What: This one-day campaign school will give you the tools and training you need to create a new political climate in your community.  The emphasis is upon giving voters clean, green candidates to move us beyond politics-as-usual at the town and state level.

Who should attend:  Anyone who 1) is thinking about running for office as a Green (Green-Rainbow) candidate, 2) wants to acquire the skills to help their favorite candidate succeed, or 3) wants to sharpen their organizing skills in support of their party or nonprofit organization.

Special speakers:  Jill Stein, 2012 Green Party candidate for President, will talk about her experiences campaigning across America in 2012 & Rosa Clemente, the 2008 Green Party candidate for Vice-President, and nationally known community organizer, independent journalist and hip-hop activist will give her take on what we need to do in this political moment.

Workshops: Workshops will address campaign planning, use of social media such as Twitter and Facebook, websites, fundraising, message development, get-out-the-vote activities, running for local offices, and campaign organization.

Leaders: In addition to workshop leaders from the Green-Rainbow Party and Maine Green Party, we are fortunate to welcome Ben Manski of Madison, Wisconsin, campaign manager, of the groundbreaking Jill Stein for President campaign. Continue Reading

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Maine Greens Elect Three; Plus Independent to State Assembly

The Maine Green Independent Party saw three local candidates win elections on Tuesday:


Greens in Portland won several races: City Councilors David Marshall and Kevin Donoghue easily won re-election to third terms on the City Council while Holly Seeliger won the open seat for the School Board District 2 (West End, Parkside). Congratulations to David, Kevin and Holly for running terrific, grassroots campaigns and for showing that Greens can govern. Are you ready to run in 2013? Form a municipal committee? Contact us today! info@mainegreens.org

While the Greens running for State legislative seats once again performed well but lost, one Green was re-elected to the state assembly as an Independent. Ben Chipman, who is a Green, wound up running for State Assembly in 2010 as an Independent and defeated his Republican and Democratic opponents. This year he won re-election:

Maine House District 119
Herbert C. Adams (D) 1,272 36.63%
Benjamin M. Chipman (I) 1,884 54.25%
Gwendolyne Elissa Tuttle (R) 317 9.13%

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Fairvote reports on instant runoff voting elections in 6 cities

Rob Richie and Dorothy Scheeline of Fairvote have written some interesting analysis of last week’s elections that used instant runoff voting, aka ranked choice voting. Instant runoff voting was used in San Francisco, CA, St. Paul, MN, and Portland, ME; in all three cities, Greens both helped enact IRV and ran in last Tuesday’s elections. For the mayoral elections in Portland and San Francisco, Fairvote has graphs that show the breakdown of votes round by round until someone takes a majority (in Portland, Greens David Marshall and John Eder finished 4th and 12th of 15; in SF, Green Terry Baum finished 11th of 16). In a Huffington Post article, Richie and Scheeline focus on the story of IRV’s success in Portland:

Repeatedly, we are seeing RCV winners being the candidates who do a particularly effective job at reaching out to voters, often with direct contact involving community debates, local events, and door-knocking. One Portland candidate, David Marshall, said he knocked on 20,000 doors. He didn’t win, but it was ballots from his supporters that provided a particularly strong boost to the new mayor’s win total.

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Portland Maine’s IRV Mayoral Race has 14 Candidates, 2 Greens

On November 8, Portland Maine will hold an election for the first popularly elected Mayor in over 80 years. Furthermore, voters will get to rank the candidates as the election will be using Instant Runoff Voting (IRV), which will be very interesting given that there are 14 candidates on the ballot.

One of those candidates, John Eder, is a former State Legislator, one of a handful of Greens ever elected to State Legislative office in the U.S. Eder, however, did not get the endorsement of the Maine Green Independent Party (MGIP), which has instead endorsed sitting City Councilor David Marshall, also a Green:

“Let there be no mistake about it, David Marshall is the Green choice for Portland’s mayor,” states Nate Shea, MGIP Chair. “His leadership on sustainable transportation, green development, and the creative economy places him among the strongest elected Greens in the nation.”

The Green Independent Party endorses Marshall because of his vision to create a modern streetcar line in Portland, to convert homes and businesses off of oil to cleaner fuels, and to grow the population density to create a more sustainable city as well as his longstanding commitment to helping constituents cut through city bureaucracy. For these reasons, the Green Independent Party strongly urges its members to rank David Marshall as their first choice for Mayor.

On Tuesday, John Eder came out and put his support behind one of his opponents, Ethan Strimling.

The endorsement comes as somewhat of a surprise because of Eder’s background. Eder helped mentor City Councilor David Marshall, the other Green Independent Party candidate running for mayor.

But Eder said Marshall is already on the City Council and “doing great work,” and the city needs fresh leadership. He said with Marshall still there, and Strimling as mayor and Eder advocating from the outside, “we’re going to make a great team for this city.”

There are two more Greens running in Portland on November 8. Josephine Okot is running for Portland School Board, and Jack Safarik is running for Portland Water Board.

Below is Mayoral Candidate David Marshall.

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Two Greens vying to become next mayor of Portland, Maine

In Portland, Maine’s largest city, the city’s first mayoral election in decades features two candidates from the Green Independent Party: former State House member John Eder and City Councilor David Marshall. Both have been featured recently in the Portland Press Herald.

In his interview, Eder said that affordable housing would be the central issue in his administration:

“We’re on the verge of the creative economy toppling the artists and workers who helped make Portland become what it is,” he said. “We can’t lose those people.”

Marshall pointed to a record of accomplishment in five years on the council and presented his plan:

Marshall’s five-point platform includes investing in the city’s school facilities, converting homes and businesses from oil to alternative fuels, and creating a streetcar line.

Those programs would cost a significant amount up front, as some opponents have pointed out. Marshall calls them “investments.” He points to a record of saving the city money.

The election will be conducted using instant runoff voting, which Green Anna Trevorrow played a key role in enacting as a member of Portland’s charter commission. Ben Chipman, an independent State House member who is closely aligned with the Greens, is also quoted in the article about Marshall.

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Greens enter Portland, Maine’s first mayoral race; hope for boost from IRV

From the Portland Daily Sun:

Portland this year embarks on an elected-mayor campaign that replaces a council-appointed mayor with one elected to an at-large seat. Through a city charter change, voters also will choose their next mayor through rank choice voting, where if any candidate falls short of a majority, then the “second choice” votes come into play in the tabulation.

MacMillan is working on the mayoral campaign for Portland’s David Marshall, an incumbent city councilor and Green Party member seeking the elected-mayor office. Another Maine Green Party member, former state legislator John Eder of Portland, announced in February his candidacy for the Mayor of Portland.

Green Party members said rank choice allows people to vote their conscience instead of feeling they’re casting a vote on a potential “spoiler” who could drain votes away from one of the two major parties.

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Green officials passed over for mayor position in Maine’s largest city

This just in from the Maine Public Broadcasting Network:

Maine’s largest city has a new mayor. The Portland City Council yesterday chose Nicholas Mavodones Jr., 49, to serve in the post. It’s Mavodones third stint in the job, according to the Portland Press Herald. In the past, councilors took turns being mayor, based on seniority. But for the second year in a row, the council overlooked Green party members who were next in line, the paper reports, choosing Mavodones instead. Continue Reading