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Green Party announces plans for national convention

Green-Convention-2012The Green Party of the United States has announced details regarding the Presidential Nominating Convention to be held at the University of Houston from Thursday, August 4 through Sunday, August 7.

GPUS Co-Chair Tamar Yager said, “Following the Republican and Democratic conventions, the Green convention will be watched closely because of widely anticipated dissatisfaction with the projected nominees of both of the established parties. We look forward to welcoming many Bernie Sanders supporters if he doesn’t emerge from the DNC as the nominee, as well as other voters who are considering alternatives to the two corporate-money parties and their candidates.”

Candidates for the presidential nomination will field questions from the media at a joint news conference on Saturday morning, with balloting later that day. The theme of the Green convention is “Houston, We Have A Solution: Vote Green 2016.”

Green Party of Texas State Executive Committee Co-Chair Laura Palmer said, “Texas Greens are excited to host this historic convention, which will bring attention to so many critical issues in a city that lies at the heart of the corporate empire. We believe Houston is uniquely situated to influence the national political dialogue, and to help lead the way in finding solutions for the future.”

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GP.org profiles Texas Green Party

texasThe official Green Party of the United States website at GP.org has published a profile of the Green Party of Texas. It reads in part:

 

The GPTX has already set a new record in 2016, with more than 50 candidates seeking offices across the state. There are candidates for the U.S. House in 19 of the state’s 36 districts, the first time the Green Party will field candidates in a majority of the state’s races.

“Texas is a red state, so there is no ‘lesser evil’ risk in voting Green,” says state co-chair Aaron Renaud. “Besides, the Democrats do not have the energy or motivation to fix the campaign finance system, in that regard they are just as culpable. In the end, I would say to vote for the only party that doesn’t accept corporate donations. I would say to put real people into office, not politicians.”

But there are challenges in organizing in a state that covers more than a quarter-million square miles and that has more than 250 counties.

Co-chair Laura Palmer says, “Because the state is so large, party cohesion is one of our biggest challenges. Getting to know party members in other areas, keeping track of the status of local parties, and having the ability to screen volunteers for key roles are all enormous concerns.” Palmer says the GPTX has started to implement an “intentionally regional approach,” urging locals in the same parts of the state to work together.