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Allwine: Baltimore press ignoring Green candidates

Maria Allwine, former Maryland Green Party gubernatorial candidate, recently had a letter published in the Baltimore Sun decrying the newspaper’s failure to cover Green Party candidates in local elections:

As usual, The Sun does a grave disservice to its readers and Baltimore City voters by refusing to acknowledge that there are Green Party candidates running in the general election. No mention is made of Doug Armstrong, running for City Council in the 14th District and Bill Barry, running for City Council in the 3rd. Both Bill and Doug are long-time community organizers and are exactly what Baltimore needs to break the stranglehold the Democratic party machine has had for decades as well as the pay-to-play system that benefits wealthy developers and political insiders and leaves the citizens of this city out in the cold. Mr. Barry received 27 percent of the vote in his previous run against Councilman Robert Curran, and with unbiased coverage from The Sun, he could well win this time. No doubt the possibility of Green Party candidates winning is why The Sun refuses to cover them. Continue Reading

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Post-election Green Party 2010 ballot access roundup

Last night the Green Party won ballot access in New York and Texas, retained it in Massachusetts and Ohio, lost it in Illinois and Wisconsin, and fell short of gaining it in Arkansas, Maryland, Minnesota, and Nevada. Here are the results by state:

Arkansas: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Jim Lendall got less than 3% of the vote for governor.

Illinois: Greens lost the ballot line and major party status gained in 2006 by Rich Whitney’s 10% for governor when Whitney got less than 5% of the vote for governor this year.

Maryland: Greens got on the 2010 ballot by petition, but failed to retain a ballot line when Maria Allwine got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

Massachusetts: Greens retain ballot access and party status after Nat Fortune earned 5% for State Auditor.

Minnesota: Annie Young’s 2.7% for State Auditor falls short of winning major party status, but retains minor party status for the Minnesota Greens.

Nevada: Greens fail to gain ballot access after David Curtis got less than 1% of the vote for governor.

New York: Greens gain ballot status through 2014 thanks to Howie Hawkins earning over 50,000 votes for governor.

Ohio: Greens retain ballot status thanks to Dennis Spisak earning over 1% for governor.

Texas: Greens gain ballot status through 2012 thanks to Ed Lindsay earning over 5% for comptroller.

Wisconsin: Greens lose ballot status after not running any statewide candidates who could qualify.

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14 Greens to Watch on Election Day

From Green Change:

Tonight, we will be focusing on the campaigns of 14 transformational Green candidates who are building the Green movement across the country. Some of these candidates are poised for history-making wins. Others are blazing the trail for future success by running party-building campaigns for statewide office.

14 Greens to Watch on Election Day

Jeremy Karpen for IL Assembly – Jeremy Karpen’s vigorous grassroots challenge to a Chicago Machine insider has earned him endorsements from the Chicago Sun-Times, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Teacher’s Union, Independent Voters of Illinois, and even Chicago Progressive Democrats of America. Karpen, a strong supporter of single-payer health care, affordable housing, mass transit, and progressive taxation, has run a clean-money campaign as part of his commitment to reforming Illinois’ notoriously dirty pay-to-play politics.

Ben Manski for WI Assembly – Ben Manski’s insurgent run has earned the support of Madison’s teachers union, the Madison Capital Times, and leading progressives including Jim Hightower, Medea Benjamin, and Thom Hartmann. The outgoing Democratic assembly member revoked his endorsement of Manski’s main opponent, a Democrat who left the Sierra Club to lobby for the coal industry. Manski is racing to the finish line with the support of a broad transpartisan coalition of elected officials, unions, students, newspapers, and activists committed to renewing Wisconsin’s trailblazing progressive tradition.

Gayle McLaughlin for Mayor of Richmond, CA – With a population over 100,000, Richmond became the largest US city with a Green mayor when Gayle McLaughlin was elected in 2006. Since then, McLaughlin has made Richmond a center of the emerging solar industry, fought successfully to increase taxes on the local Chevron oil refinery while lowering them for small businesses, and brought down violent crime with expanded community policing. Her supporters, including Green For All founder Van Jones, hope that her record of positive accomplishments in office will carry Mayor Gayle to victory.

Hugh Giordano for PA Assembly – Hugh Giordano is a union organizer from Philadelphia’s Roxborough neighborhood whose people-powered campaign has electrified the race for an open seat in a traditionally Democratic district. After a CEO won the Democratic primary with only 30% of the vote, Giordano’s strong support for public education, single-payer health care, and worker’s rights has gained him the backing of local unions and maverick Democrats and made him a contender for the win.

Dan Hamburg for Mendocino County (CA) Supervisor – In a county the size of Delaware on the coast of California, former member of Congress and Voice Of The Environment executive director Dan Hamburg is running for supervisor to build a vibrant, sustainable local economy and protect the beautiful natural landscape for generations to come. Hamburg finished first in the 4-way June primary, and has been endorsed by the third-place finisher as well as local unions and environmentalists in his head-to-head race against the conservative, developer-backed candidate who finished a close 2nd in the primary. Continue Reading

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Green candidates support marijuana legalization

In a year that has seen the biggest upsurge of activism against marijuana prohibition in American history, Green Party candidates across the country are leading the fight for marijuana legalization while Democrats and Republicans defend the failed, destructive “war on drugs” prohibition regime.

The eyes of Americans who oppose prohibition are on California’s Proposition 19, the Regulate, Control, and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010. The California Green Party and its leading candidates, including gubernatorial candidate Laura Wells and US Senate candidate Duane Roberts, support Proposition 19, while the Democratic and Republican candidates for governor and US Senate all publicly oppose it.

Meanwhile, Green gubernatorial candidates like Howie Hawkins in New York, Rich Whitney in Illinois, and Jill Stein in Massachusetts have injected marijuana legalization into the public debate and rallied anti-prohibition voters, who number 46% in the latest Gallup poll, around an issue considered taboo by the political establishment.

All of these candidates, plus other Green gubernatorial candidates including Deb Shafto in Texas, Dennis Spisak in Ohio, Maria Allwine in Maryland, Morgan Reeves in South Carolina, and Jim Lendall in Arkansas as well as over 100 Green candidates for federal, state and local office, have signed onto a 10-point program called the “Green New Deal”, which includes legalizing marijuana and ending prohibition as one of 10 major reforms needed to put the country back on the right track. See Green Change for a list of candidates endorsing the Green New Deal by state.

By voting Green, you not only send a strong message that you want a sensible drug policy; in many cases, your vote helps the Green Party maintain its ballot line in your state, enabling Greens to run more and stronger campaigns in the future. If you want to legalize marijuana, vote Green.

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Maria Allwine for Governor of Maryland (Video)

Sent in by William, Maria Allwine is an activist with the “Maryland Coalition to Re-Regulate BGE.” It called a press conference on Oct. 27, 2010, in front of the office of the Public Service Commission, in Baltimore, MD. Over the years, Ms. Allwine has battled hard against any more rate hikes and for “a moratorium on any rate increases in BGE bills.” Ms. Allwine is also the Green Party’s candidate for governor in Maryland. At today’s event, she ripped into BGE; incumbent Governor Martin O’Malley, a Democrat; and also, the Republican candidate for governor, Robert Ehrlich.

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Green Party Candidates for Governor 2010

13 Green Party candidates are on the ballot in 2010 for State Governor, from New England to California and everywhere in between. Rich Whitney had a record setting campaign four years ago when he took 11% of the vote (the highest percent of any Green Party campaign for Governor) on 325,000 votes (second highest vote total ever for a Green Party candidate, Peter Camejo won 393,000 in California in 2002). Jill Stein ran for Governor in 2002 and won 76,000 votes for 3.5%. Howie Hawkins is no stranger to statewide campaigning, he won 55,000 votes in New York running for US Senate in 2006.

2010 Candidates for Governor are an experienced group of campaigners and public speakers who are bringing a Green alternative before the voters in 13 states. Laura Wells, Farheen Hakeem, & Jim Lendall are no strangers to either Greens or the campaign trail. If you can support their campaigns in any way please contact their campaigns or donate on their websites.

Jill Stein, Massachusetts – Dr. Jill Stein is a mother, housewife, physician, longtime teacher of internal medicine, and pioneering environmental-health advocate. She is the co-author of two widely-praised reports, In Harm’s Way: Toxic Threats to Child Development, published in 2000, and Environmental Threats to Healthy Aging, published in 2009. The first of these has been translated into four languages and is used worldwide. The reports promote green local economies, sustainable agriculture, clean power, and freedom from toxic threats.

Howie Hawkins, New York – Howie Hawkins has been an organizer in movements for peace, justice, labor, the environment, and independent politics since the late 1960s. He was a co-founder of the anti-nuclear Clamshell Alliance in 1976 and the Green Party in the US in 1984. For the last decade Howie has worked unloading trucks at UPS, where he is a member of Teamsters Local 317 and active in Teamsters for a Democratic Union, US Labor Against the War, and the Labor Campaign for Single Payer Healthcare.

Maria Allwine, Maryland – Maria Allwine is a long-time community organizer and peace and justice activist. She has participated and been arrested in many nonviolent direct actions against the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, was Co-Chair of the Maryland Green Party and is a member of various Baltimore City activist groups. In 2006 she ran against State Senator Joan Carter Conway and received 11% of the vote and in 2007 ran for Baltimore City Council President against Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, received 17% of the vote.

Morgan Reeves, South Carolina – Reeves played college football at Michigan State, then in the NFL with Detroit Lions and Baltimore Colts. In business, Reeves established and managed a land-clearing company. He’s also been involved in various community service projects, and has served as a pastor at six churches.

Howard Switzer, Tennessee – Howard Switzer describes himself best: “I am a hippy, proud because we hippies have been right on every issue for the last 40 years. We were right about Nixon, Racism, Vietnam, consumerism, nuclear power, environmental pollution, organic food, natural birth, green renewable and appropriate technology …and we are right about the corporate control of our national institutions. My goal is not to overthrow the system but to make it irrelevant by reviving democracy, by making sure that every organization, our church, school, or government is run according to its principles.”

Dennis Spisak, Ohio – Dennis Spisak is a two term elected member of the Struthers Board of Education and past candidate for US House of Representatives (2008) when he got 4.82% of the vote. Spisak and the Libertarian candidate have both been banned from the Gubernatorial debates in Ohio.

Harley Mikkelson, Michigan – Mikkelson was a Green Party candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives in 2002 and 2004 and the Green Party candidate for the U.S. Senate in 2008. He is a Vietnam Veteran, a retired state employee and union man. He has been in the Peace Movement since becoming active in Vietnam Veterans Against the War in 1968.

Rich Whitney, Illinois – Rich Whitney is a 55-year-old civil rights and employment lawyer from Carbondale. As a lawyer, he has fought for working people who have lost their jobs or had their rights violated. A founder of the Illinois Green Party, he has long been politically active in support of the labor, health-care reform, environmental, civil rights, and peace movements. In 2006, he served as the Green Party’s first candidate for Governor, winning over 360,000 votes and making it possible for Illinois voters to have a third choice on the ballot statewide.

Farheen Hakeem, Minnesota – Farheen was born and raised on the north side of Chicago, with her two brothers from immigrant parents. Her parents were small business owners. She moved to Minneapolis in 1999 and was active in the peace movement and as a community organizer and educator. She has led several high profile campaigns for office. In 2005 she ran for Mayor and earned 14% of the vote. The following year she ran for County Commissioner and won 33% of the vote. In 2008 she ran for an open seat in the State Legislature and finished with 30% of the vote.

Jim Lendall, Arkansas – In his own words: “I served in the Arkansas Legislature for eight years, introducing innovative legislation and speaking out for those with no other voice. I fought against corporate welfare and the corporate assault on working people and the environment. I will bring that same commitment to the office of Governor of Arkansas…”

Deb Shafto, Texas – Deb Shafto is a retired teacher and former union organizer. She is a passionate environmentalist, and is concerned about the expanding wealth divide in America.

David Scott Curtis, Nevada – I am going to refer directly to this fascinating and insightful article from Las Vegas City Life, excerpting just the first paragraph to get you to read the entire thing: “he aspiring governor lounges inside a coffee shop in downtown Las Vegas, drinking juice from a bottle and explaining how his education plan will revive the state’s failing schools. He doesn’t have a bound report, or even an acronym — just a few observations from a product of the system.”

Laura Wells, California – Laura Wells ran for State Controller in 2002 and won 419,873 votes, 5.8% of the total. She ran for the same seat in 2006 and won 260,047 votes, 3.2% of the total. She has lived in California for 30 years and has been active with the California Green Party for at least 8 years. She has been excluded from the California Gubernatorial debates and was reportedly arrested at the most recent one while attempting to enter with a ticket.

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The League of Women Voters and the debate issue

Fighting to be included in debates is a familiar exercise for Greens in the United States. Most political organizations fall into one of two camps: either they support open debates with all ballot-qualified candidates, or they support closed debates, which are typically limited to Democrats and Republicans. However, the League of Women Voters, in various times and places, has played the role of both ally and adversary to supporters of open debates.

The League of Women Voters ran presidential debates until 1988, when the Democratic and Republican parties, unhappy with the LWV’s inclusion of independent candidates like John Anderson, formed the Commission on Presidential Debates to seize control of the debates. The LWV issued a statement to announce its withdrawal of sponsorship for the debates:

The League of Women Voters is withdrawing sponsorship of the presidential debates … because the demands of the two campaign organizations would perpetrate a fraud on the American voter. It has become clear to us that the candidates’ organizations aim to add debates to their list of campaign-trail charades devoid of substance, spontaneity and answers to tough questions. The League has no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the American public.

However, this year the League of Women Voters in Illinois has invited only the Democratic and Republican candidates for governor to an October 20th televised debate, despite the fact that Green Party candidate Rich Whitney received over 10% of the vote for governor 4 years ago. Whitney has called a press conference for Monday October 11th to demand that the LWV include him. Whitney’s campaign has also created the facebook group “Let Rich Whitney into the League of Women Voters Debate” and this video message from Rich Whitney to Illinois voters, which the campaign will release as a TV ad if it can raise enough money:

Whitney will take part in a debate with independent Scott Lee Cohen and Libertarian Lex Green on WJBC on Monday 11 October from 3-4:30PM. Democrat Quinn and Republican Brady declined to participate.

In Connecticut, Green Party Attorney General candidate Steve Fournier has filed a complaint with the IRS challenging the LWV’s tax-exempt status. Fournier says that while the League is supposed to be nonpartisan, its criteria for debate participation discriminate against independent and third-party candidates.

In Maryland, a post at the Baltimore Sun’s Maryland Politics blog entitled “Third-party gov candidates demand to be in debate” drew this comment:

The gubernatorial debate sponsored by the League of Women Voters is the “real” debate to attend. It’s Tuesday, Oct. 19, 7:30 pm, in the Cultural Arts Center at Montgomery College’s Takoma Park campus, 7995 Georgia Avenue. For more information, see http://lwvmd.org/n/node/3261 or call 301-984-9585. Unlike WJZ-TV and the Baltimore Jewish Council, the LWV serves only the voters, and all of them. Third Party candidates have to work hard and overcome many electoral hurdles to get on the ballot; they deserve to be heard.

Maryland Green Party gubernatorial candidate Maria Allwine also commented on the post.

Is the League of Women Voters in your state a friend or foe of open debates? Can Greens call on the League’s better angels to ensure that our voices are included in the debates? What do you think?

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Two candidates file for MD Green Party nomination for governor

The Baltimore Sun’s Maryland Politics blog reports that 2 candidates have filed to be the Maryland Green Party candidate for governor:

To Maria Allwine supporters, Corrogan Vaughn is nothing more than a Green Party crasher.

Allwine has run four times as a Green candidate, winning 17 percent of the vote in the 2007 Baltimore City Council president race. Vaughn was, until Tuesday, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate.

Each filed paperwork just hours before the deadline to run as the Green Party candidate for governor. Continue Reading

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Maryland community activist declares Green campaign for governor

Investigative Voice reports that Maria Allwine has joined the race for Governor of Maryland as a Green Party candidate:

A well-known community activist and tireless crusader against the deregulation of the state’s utilities declared Monday she will join the race for Maryland’s highest office.

Maria Allwine, whose vocal and well-publicized opposition to Constellation Energy cost her job with a local law firm, says she will be seeking the Green Party nomination for governor.

This is not the first time Allwine has run for public office. In 2007 she ran for City Council president, garnering 18,000 votes, a large number for an alternative-party candidate.

“It’s not that people need or want no government or less government but that we understand the government we have no longer serves our interests,” Allwine said in a written statement released Monday afternoon.

Read the full article at Investigative Voice.

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Maryland Green Party Annual Assembly to be held this Saturday 22 May

Via Baltimore Greens:

Kathy Phillips, Keynote Speaker for Maryland Green Party Annual Assembly;
Panel discussion to feature Maryland Green Party 2010 candidates

WHAT: The Maryland Green Party Annual Assembly is the annual meeting for registered Green Party members in the state of Maryland. Maryland Green Party members from across the state will meet to elect officers for the organization and participate in panel discussions. The keynote speaker Kathy Phillips will speak at 1:15 pm and will be followed by a panel of Maryland Green Party candidates running for office in Maryland this year. The event is open to the public regardless of party affiliation. Continue Reading