0

Flowers to hold Maryland Green primary get out the vote event Friday

Maryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers will meet voters at the Green Party of the United States national headquarters in Takoma Park, Maryland, on Friday evening from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. to urge party members to vote in the Maryland Green Party’s primary. Maryland Greens can vote by mail through Saturday, April 30, or in person in Baltimore on Sunday, May 1. (Ballots will be available at the Flowers event.)

Though Flowers and most of the Green candidates for U.S. House are unopposed in their primary races, voters will also have the option to select “None of the Above” or to say that the party should run no candidate. There is a competitive primary in the Eighth District between Elizabeth Croydon, Charles Galloway, and Nancy Wallace. There is also a competitive Green primary for Baltimore mayor between Joshua Harris, David Marriott, and Emanuel McCray.

Flowers and Harris appeared on the Real News Network as part of their coverage of the Maryland Democratic and Republican primaries Tuesday evening.

1

Senate candidate Flowers: Maryland Green primaries do not end today

flowersMaryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers is reminding party members in the state that the Green primary is not over, despite the Democratic and Republican primaries in the state being held today.

Though the Green Party has ballot access in Maryland, the state sponsors only Democratic and Republican primaries. The Green Party is having a by-mail primary through April 30, with in-person voting in Baltimore on May 1. Flowers is hosting a meet and greet at the national Green Party headquarters in Takoma Park on Friday evening from 5:00 to 7:00 to facilitate last-minute balloting.

Though Flowers, and U.S. House candidates Nnabu Eze (Third District), Kamesha Clark (Fourth District), George Gluck (Sixth District), and Myles Hoenig (Seventh District) face no opposition, Greens may also vote “None of the Above” or “No Candidate”. There is a competitive primary in the Eighth District between Elizabeth Croydon, Charles Galloway, and Nancy Wallace.

Flowers is urging Greens to respond to coverage of today’s Maryland primaries by posting comments to “let the media and readers know that there are more than two parties in this state and the election won’t be over until November 8th,” and to post reminders “that Dr. Margaret Flowers is running a serious campaign and is ready to serve as the next U.S. Senator from Maryland. … We can’t rely on the media to cover our message, so we need you to be the media!”

0

Maryland Green U.S. Senate candidate Flowers calls for tax justice

flowersMaryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers is calling for congressional action “to enforce tax justice and stop the hiding of trillions of dollars of individual and corporate wealth in ‘offshore’ accounts in the more than 90 countries and US states such as Delaware, Nevada and Wyoming that serve as tax havens,” according to a release from her campaign.

Flowers said, “As we are re-discovering in the recently-released Panama Papers, which give us a pinhole look into the world of wealth-hiding. Communities, cities and entire nations do not have the tax base they need to provide basic services because trillions in taxable income is being hidden. If this money were kept in country and taxed, many nations would be debt-free. In the US, this wealth could fund improvements to schools and infrastructure or investment in the green energy economy in a way that creates high quality jobs and yearly dividends to the public.”

The Baltimore Post-Examiner runs a feature on the Flowers campaign, writing, “A revolutionized economy that’s fueled entirely by renewable energy, established far faster than either major party is proposing. Universal — truly universal — health care in a system that takes decisions out of the hands of insurance companies. A foreign policy that’s more dovish and acknowledging of the Palestinians’ plight. Those are just a few of her proposals as she seeks the Green Party nod for November.”

1

Maryland Green U.S. Senate candidate Flowers writes about removal from debate

flowersMaryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers writes in Baltimore Brew about being forcibly removed from a candidate forum at Goucher College on March 28. Flowers had been twice invited to the event before being disinvited.

She writes, “Greens constantly face these kinds of barriers that prevent them from competing with the two major parties. … The media barely reports our existence and we are excluded from debates and public forums. … This is part of the democracy crisis — when a party that does not represent the interests of the wealthy is left out, the public debate is stifled. And voters are the biggest losers when alternative voices are left out.”

Flowers writes that had she “been permitted to participate in the debate,” she would have raised several issues “that are not being discussed” including construction of the Cove Point fracked gas terminal, the impact of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, “ending poverty by bringing back a Guaranteed Basic Income,” ending the Drug War and mass incarceration, and holding Wall Street accountable for the financial crisis of the last decade and its continued effects.

0

Baltimore Green Party nominating primary underway

Baltimore-Green-PartyThe Baltimore Green Party Primary, in which registered Green voters in Baltimore City, Maryland will select nominees for mayor and city council, is now underway. Green voters can request ballots by mail; they must be received by the party by April 30. In-person voting will take place at the Baltimore Green Party office on May 1.

There are three candidates — Joshua Harris, David Marriott, and Emanuel McCray — in the party’s first-ever contested mayoral primary. The city council races are not contested, but voters can also choose None Of The Above or No Candidate In This Seat.

Baltimore Green Party Co-Chair Jeremy Collins said, “The upcoming primary gives the people of Baltimore their chance to choose someone to represent their interests. It’s an exciting thing to witness democracy working as its supposed to. We have exciting candidates ready to challenge this one-party system. This will be a transformative election season for Baltimore.”

1

Maryland Green congressional candidate Croydon takes part in White House cannabis march

Elizabeth Croydon, who is running for the Green Party U.S. House nomination in Maryland’s Eighth District, took part in the #Reschedule420 Emergency National Mobilization to Deschedule Cannabis demonstration outside the White House last Saturday.

Charles “Teddy” Galloway III and Nancy Wallace are also seeking the Green nomination in the by-mail primary.

0

Maryland Green U.S. House candidate Hoenig says Greens are real alternative

hoenigMyles Hoenig, Green Party candidate for U.S. House in Maryland’s Seventh District, said in an interview with Iran’s PressTV that the Green Party, not Sen. Bernie Sanders, offers the real alternative to traditional American politics.

“For the Democratic Party, Bernie Sanders is the real deal when it comes to a ‘revolution,'” Hoenig said. “However, Sanders is not revolutionary. He’s running as a Democrat. He wants taxes to be fairer. He wants our military to be used better, and if better, have proxies carry out our wars of aggression, primarily in the Middle East.”

He continued, “The only party at the moment that truly reflects a greater degree of revolution is the Green Party, whose likely candidate is Jill Stein. Her ‘Power to the People Plan’ creates deep system change, moving from the greed and exploitation of corporate capitalism to a human-centered economy that puts people, planet and peace over profit. Her platform goes far beyond that of Sanders or any other Democrat: not just free college education but debt forgiveness, something that would leave the banks empty handed and not something Sanders advocates.”

1

Flowers forcibly removed from Maryland U.S. Senate candidate forum

Maryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers was forcibly prevented from participating in a candidate forum sponsored by the Baltimore Jewish Council and Goucher College on Monday evening. Flowers, who had been extended invitations to the debate twice by the organizers, was abruptly disinvited without notice two weeks before the event.

When the candidates were asked to take the stage, Flowers stepped up to remind the BJC that her exclusion was in violation of IRS regulations that require non-profit organizations to be non-partisan. She said, “Many times during the first half of the forum, the moderator and Republican candidates emphasized that in this political moment voters are fed up with the status quo and are looking for alternatives. Yet, the one candidate who was invited and provides an alternative to the the two party system was excluded. I was ready to answer the questions but I was not given the chance. I wanted to participate in this debate, not protest it.”

Flowers was invited to the event on January 7 and accepted that same day. At that time, Sarah Mersky, the Baltimore Jewish Council’s Director of Government Relations, said the event would be “a wonderful opportunity for Baltimore and the Jewish community to get to know you better.” The BJC also later Dr. Flowers know of a postponement of the original February date, indicating that they still wanted her to take part. However, on March 11, Flowers received a terse message from Mersky disinviting her, saying the event would be limited “to contested primary candidates only” — a late change in the rules. The Flowers campaign said in reply that the IRS “has issued regulations for non-profit organizations requiring them to be non-partisan and inclusive” and that “in recent debates in the Baltimore area, non-profit organizations that initially excluded Green Party candidates decided to reverse their decision when their lawyers looked at the law.”

In phone conversations and personal meetings with the Flowers campaign, the BJC stated that the event was limited to candidates polling at least five in polls, a new requirement that had never been mentioned before to the Flowers campaign. Flowers pointed out that there have been no polls of Green Party candidates, making it impossible for the BJC to know that Flowers does not reach the polling threshold. Flowers asserted that her level of support in the Green Party is well above five percent.

Under Maryland law, Green Party candidates are not permitted to appear on the ballot printed by the state and distributed to voters during the state-funded primary election. “This is one of many ways the two wealth-based parties create an unfair electoral system for those who challenge them,” said Flowers. The Green Party is holding a self-funded primary election that any person registered to vote and affiliated with the Green Party may participate in. By rule, all Green Party nominations are contested.

0

Maryland U.S. Senate candidate Flowers calls for action on World Water Day

flowerswebMaryland Green Party U.S. Senate candidate Margaret Flowers is calling on candidates nationwide to acknowledge and fight the corporate manipulation responsible for water crises across the United States. She is also calling for recognition that access to clean water is a fundamental human right, and should be protected for all people.

Flowers said, “It is World Water Day, and the United Nations estimates that there are over 600 million people without access to clean water. Environmental factors like like factory farming, increased pollution and overuse in industrial production are a major, preventable cause of water shortages. There is another preventable cause of water crises in U.S. cities — corporate manipulation of municipal water programs that steal funds needed to improve failing infrastructure. I am calling on candidates for public office at all levels to resist corporate water grabs that are preventing the repair of degrading water systems and putting people at risk.”

Her full statement is available online.