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Green Party Pres. candidate Cynthia Mckinney national speaking tour

-Mckinney to speak in Los Angeles on Saturday June 18th!!

EYEWITNESS LIBYA: CYNTHIA MCKINNEY REPORTS BACK ON THE MASSIVE BOMBIMG OF TRIPOLI
-Mckinney to speak in Los Angeles on Saturday June 18th!!

-Cynthia Mckinney was the 2008 Green Party Presidential candidate along with Vice Presidential Candidate Rosa Clemente.

The ANSWER Coalition is sponsoring a nationwide speaking tour featuring former Congressional representative and presidential candidate Cynthia McKinney, who is currently in Libya on her second fact-finding mission. McKinney will offer an eyewitness report exposing the truth that has been concealed by the western corporate media.

Also speaking on the tour will be Akbar Muhammad of the Nation of Islam, former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark and Brian Becker, National Coordinator of the ANSWER Coalition.

McKinney and the other speakers will shed light on the devastating impact of the U.S./NATO bombing of Libya and the extensive civilian casualties that the White House, Pentagon and the media have persistently denied. McKinney is currently on her second trip to Libya during the NATO bombing. During her time there, she has visited several hospitals, and has conducted video interviews with doctors and the wounded.

Under the guise of humanitarian intervention and protecting civilians, NATO has carried out a massive bombing of Africa’s largest oil producer. McKinney’s report shows how devastating the bombing has been for civilians in Tripoli and elsewhere.

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Former Green Party Matt Gonzalez bid for Mayor of San Francisco in 2003(a history lesson)

(Taken from wikipedia)

In 2003, Gonzalez ran for Mayor of San Francisco, in a bid to replace outgoing two-term mayor Willie Brown. On a ballot with nine candidates’ names, Gonzalez finished second in the initial mayoral election on November 4 behind Gavin Newsom, a Democrat and fellow member of the Board of Supervisors who had been endorsed by Brown. Gonzalez received 19.6 percent of the total vote to Newsom’s 41.9 percent. Because none of the candidates received a majority a run-off election was held on December 9, gaining national and international media coverage.

Gonzalez faced a difficult run-off election; only three percent of voters in San Francisco were registered to his Green Party, and the Democratic Party, dominant in San Francisco, was opposing his candidacy. If elected, Gonzalez would have been the first Green Party mayor of any large American city. Although Gonzalez was endorsed by several key local Democrats, including five among the Board of Supervisors, national Democratic figures, concerned about Ralph Nader’s role in the 2000 presidential election, became involved on Newsom’s behalf. Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Jesse Jackson, Dianne Feinstein, and Nancy Pelosi all campaigned for Newsom. In the left-leaning political newsletter CounterPunch, Bruce Anderson wrote, “If Matt Gonzalez, a member of the Green Party, is elected mayor of San Francisco, it will be a dagger straight into the rotted heart of the Democratic Party… He wants to represent the many against the fortunate few the present mayor has faithfully represented for years now.”

The candidate, however, saw the election in similar terms. “They’re scared, not of a Green being elected mayor”, he said, “but of an honest person being elected mayor.” Many volunteers worked on Gonzalez’s campaign in the run-off. “He’s the indie-rock Kennedy”, one supporter said of Gonzalez. Said Rich DeLeon, professor of political science at San Francisco State University, “The Gonzalez campaign was truly a mobilizing campaign. It really attracted young people who had not been involved — who were perhaps cynical and apathetic — into the active electorate.”

Progressives championed Gonzalez as an alternative to a more centrist Democratic mainstream:

“ Gonzalez was the first Mexican-American, non-Democratic Party candidate in the City’s history to actually campaign, unabashedly, as a leftist and anti-corporate politician. He turned San Francisco’s sordid and sold-out political history upside down, invoking an inspired and conscious resistance from the City’s previous generations’ experiences of exclusion, exploitation, disenfranchisement and dot.com displacement. ”

In an interview in January 2005 on his last day in office as a Supervisor, Gonzalez said of his campaign, “After getting in the runoff, literally the day after, as I heard Mayor Brown and others start attacking me for being a communist and racist, well, I started thinking I was going to lose in the very landslide I had foreseen for other candidates. Naturally, I worked hard to represent progressive ideas and win the race. By the end, we started thinking, hey, maybe it’s possible.”

Newsom outspent Gonzales $4.4–4.9 million to $800,000–900,000. Gonzalez sought to tighten spending caps and expand public financing, and accused Newsom of campaign improprieties and spending limit violations. Newsom won the election by 133,546 to 119,329 votes.

Newsom won the run-off race, capturing 53 percent of the vote to Gonzalez’s 47 percent, and winning by about 11,000 votes. Newsom ran as a business friendly centrist Democrat and a moderate in San Francisco politics; some of his opponents called him conservative.  Newsom claimed he was a centrist in the Dianne Feinstein mold.  He ran on the slogan “great cities, great ideas” and presented over 21 policy papers. Newsom pledged to continue working on San Francisco’s homelessness issue. Newsom was sworn in as Mayor on January 3, 2004. He called for unity among the city’s political factions and promised to address the issues of potholes, public schools, and affordable housing. Newsom said he was “a different kind of leader who “isn’t afraid to solve even the toughest problems.”

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Green mayoral candidate and Nader’s VP candidate Matt Gonzalez named chief attorney of San Francisco’s Public Defender

Posted by Ross Levin at IPR:

For some time, Matt Gonzalez represented the Green Party as well as his constituency on the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. He also ran what was perhaps the most competitive Green campaign for mayor of a major city in US history, losing by about six percentage points to Gavin Newsom. He later left the Green Party and became Ralph Nader’s running mate in 2008. Now he is back in power in San Francisco, having been appointed to be the chief attorney of the city’s Public Defender’s office. From The Bay Citizen:
Continue Reading

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Gonzalez, Cobb endorse Manski for Assembly

From Green Change:

Ben Manski’s campaign for state representative in Wisconsin is exceptional. Ben is a bold, experienced Green leader. He is running a stellar grassroots campaign. He can win.

His opponent is a corporate lobbyist who was paid $192,000 to lobby for the coal industry. His opponent has also been falsely claiming endorsements from Wisconsin leaders like Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin.

Ben has the people power to win.  More than 140 volunteers are working for him to get-out-the-vote on Election Day.

Now he needs more financial power.  He’s raised $30,000 so far.

Please give what you can today at http://votemanski.com.

Below is a letter from Matt Gonzalez, former president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and a member of the Green Change Board of Directors, and David Cobb, the 2004 Green Party presidential candidate, about Ben’s campaign. They are supporting his campaign too.  I hope you join us. Continue Reading

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Wall St Journal Expose on San Francisco Greens

The Wall Street Journal has shined a flashlight at the San Francisco Green Party in this article, stating: “Declines in Membership, Donations Mirror National Organization’s Struggles; Headquarters Close but Meetings Remain”.

I highly recommend reading this article, it offers so many different angles to Green Party growth, stagnation, decline, purpose, mission, etc.

Matt Gonzalez:

Mr. Gonzalez, meanwhile, says he left the Green Party because he wanted to run for vice president as an independent, and hasn’t rejoined the local Greens in part because of their lack of organization. He says Greens have hurt themselves by placing ideology ahead of practicality, such as by imposing rules that limit how much in contributions a Green candidate could take. “Sometimes you can apply principles of political purity that aren’t very functional and you run into problems,” he says. “It’s part of the charm, but it’s also a liability if it’s taken too far.”

Ross Mirkarimi:

San Francisco Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi, the only Green politician currently in elected city office, says the party didn’t adequately retain Green voters excited by Mr. Nader’s 2000 presidential bid, Mr. Gonzalez’s 2003 mayoral bid and Mr. Mirkarimi’s 2004 supervisor bid. “We didn’t harness in a way where we could rebuild our profile locally,” he says.

The supervisor says the Green Party, locally and nationally, can rebuild itself by focusing on winning elections and sharpening its message, which he says is too vague, to appeal to more voters. Building coalitions with Democrats can also help, he says.

Brent McMillan:

Brent McMillan, executive director of the Green Party of the U.S., estimates that the recession sent donations plummeting about 10% from a couple of years earlier. He adds that many Greens left the party to vote for Democratic President Barack Obama. “There was a tough time,” Mr. McMillan says.

Erika McDonald:

“It’s been an uphill battle,” says Green Party spokeswoman Erika McDonald. “It’s never been easy building an alternative.”

Read the article, please comment here!

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Clemente and Gonzalez respond to VP Debate on Democracy Now!

Green Party VP candidate Rosa Clemente, and Ralph Nader’s VP Matt Gonzalez are interviewed together on Democracy Now:

We play excerpts of the much-anticipated showdown between Sen. Joe Biden and Alaska Governor Sarah Palin and get reaction from two vice-presidential candidates excluded from the debate: Matt Gonzalez, running mate of Independent candidate Ralph Nader, and Rosa Clemente, running mate of Cynthia McKinney of the Green Party.

Read, Listen or Watch on Democracy Now here!

Teasers:

ROSA CLEMENTE: Well, I mean, I think both people up there last night were clear that they don’t have the majority of the American people’s interests at heart, including the majority of American people that have called, into the last week, telling the Democrats and the Republicans no bailout.

MATT GONZALEZ: Well, I think, first of all, it was one of the things about the debate that I thought was awkward. I think the Democrats successfully, during the debate, really placed the blame at the feet of the Republicans, but it’s not historically correct.

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The Green Vice President: Indulgent Speculation

While Cynthia McKinney has not locked up the Green Party nomination yet, she is well on her way to sealing the nomination.

Which leads one to wonder – who will she select as her running mate? Based on previous GP rules, the Presidential Nominee names whom they want to be their VP, and the Delegates vote it up or down (at least that is how it was told to me).

So here is a speculative list of potential Vice Presidential running mates if Cynthia McKinney gets the nomination:

Jared Ball – Jared Ball of DC was a very promising GP Presidential candidate up until he dropped out of the race in January to endorse Cynthia McKinney. Ball, a Communications Studies Professor, an independent journalist, a veteran of the first Iraq War and a hip hop activist, would bring the “Capital Resistance” component of his campaign to the McKinney campaign. He would be a tireless campaigner, and an all African-American Green Party ticket would be a very interesting aspect to the 2008 “race”. I see Ball as a real possibility.

Mike Gravel – His campaign for President as a Democrat got him a fan base but no party support (probably due to calling all the other candidates ‘losers’ and challenging the establishment). He then sought the Libertarian nomination and got shoved aside by Bob Barr. Gravel could bring to the McKinney ticket a nationally known “name” (with youtube videos) and probably pick up voters who are younger, anti-establishment, but turned off by the ‘seriousness’ of Ralph Nader. I have huge respect for what Gravel did as a Senator during the Vietnam War (had a role with ending the draft, for one), but I don’t think he would be the best choice as a running mate. He could even drag the ticket down.

Kat Swift – Kat’s youth and veteran Green Party activism would give the Green Party an all female ticket, supporting the Green Party’s value of “feminism” and potentially appealing to a broad segment of the electorate that may not be turned off by Obama, McCain, Nader, Barr, and all the other men on the ballot in November. Its too bad the Green Party won’t be on the ballot in Texas, Swift’s home state.


Rich Whitney – Rich Whitney’s major impact on the Illinois Governor’s race (10%) put the Illinois Green Party on the map. Putting Whitney on the ticket would help in Illinois, where McKinney should have a good showing already, might make sense. Whitney also has campaigning experience, fund raising experience (his 2006 campaign has already donated several thousand dollars to the McKinney campaign), and almost 350,000 votes in 2006 could add to the ticket.

Jesse Johnson – Jesse Johnson is a Third Party champion after two huge statewide campaigns for Governor and U.S. Senate with the West Virginia Mountain Party. In 2007 the Mountain Party “merged” with the Green Party and became the WV affiliate of the GPUS. Johnson has a lot of appeal among Greens, especially those whom he has met first hand, but he does not have the history of Green “Party Activism” that others do. While he would bring some color to the ticket and could influence votes in the “Obama-challenged” Appalachian region, I don’t think he is the strongest choice for Veep.

Matt Gonzalez – Unfortunately he’s taken. (Plus, per the U.S. Constitution the Prez and Veep must have different home states and now that McKinney hails from CA Matt would thus be ineligible.) Ralph Nader scored possibly the best Green running mate possible when he tagged Gonzalez to be his Veep. The former President of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors who almost defeated Gavin Newsom to become Mayor of San Francisco is a Green Party legend and hero.

Kent Mesplay – Another veteran Green Party activist and organizer who has run for major political office several times now. Mesplay would bring to the ticket a solid environmental / ecological component, which based on the four pillars (Grassroots Democracy, Peace, Social Justice, Ecological Wisdom) is probably McKinney’s weakest position. Mesplay would fill a hole in that area and in that ticket. Oh, wait, he’s a California resident as well…


Sedinam Kinamo Christin Moyowasifza-Curry
(aka SKCM Curry) – While SKCM Curry is the only “declared” candidate for the Vice President slot on the Green Party ballot, I have to again point out that she is a California Resident, thus can not be McKinney’s running mate. Curry is a Green Party activist in South Central LA. A video of her in 07 can be seen here.

Cindy Sheehan – “Peace Mom” Sheehan is a “Green Leaning Independent (GLI)” who was heavily recruited to seek the Green Party Presidential nomination herself. She would greatly add to the already strong anti-war positions of McKinney, as well as creating an all-female ticket, but she is running an Independent campaign for U.S. House against Democrat Nancy Pelosi. In California. Oh, right, she can’t be the Veep.

Other (unlikely) possibilities:
Winona LaDuke – 1996 and 2000 Veep on the Nader ticket, Native American from Minnesota. Ain’t gonna happen.
Pat LaMarche – 2004 Veep on the Cobb ticket, who surpassed 10% of the vote in her 2006 bid for Governor of Maine. She has been campaigning for Jesse Johnson. Does that take her out of the picture? Maybe not, but she would be an extreme long shot pick.
Ralph Nader – the “Dream Ticket” that never happened.

Who do YOU think should be considered for the Veep slot if McKinney gets the nomination?